AFS Access

For TarHeel Linux 6

openafs-logoThe default build of TarHeel Linux 6 does not contain an OpenAFS Client.

However, we realize that many people use AFS on a daily basis, and have important things stored there.

It is very easy to install AFS access on TarHeel Linux 6 machines to gain access to the UNC ISIS AFS cell by following the procedure below.

This operation has to be performed as the root user. From a terminal session, one would do the following:

prompt$ su -
Password:
# yum install openafs-client openafs-krb5

This installation will also install some other packages to satisfy the dependency.  Once the AFS client is installed, you may want to change the default to isis.unc.edu by editing the file, /usr/vice/etcThisCell to become the following.

isis.unc.edu

Then, you can start up the AFS client service with these commands.

# chkconfig afs on
# service afs start
# exit

This causes /afs to be mounted.  Then, exit from being root.

All TarHeel Linux 6 users get Kerberos tickets at login. To get an AFS token, the user needs to type the following command.  This “aklog” command converts Kerberos tickets to AFS token allowing users to have access to AFS cell.

prompt$ aklog

That’s it, folks! Really!

For TarHeel Linux 5

The default build of TarHeel Linux 5 does not contain an OpenAFS Client.

However, we realize that many people use AFS on a daily basis, and have important things stored there.

We have created a package in rpm format, which, when installed, brings up a fully-configured OpenAFS client and starts a daemon which watches for kernel updates. This daemon will re-configure the necessary modules for the new kernel automatically without user intervention.

This operation has to be performed as the root. From a terminal session, one would do the following:

prompt$ su -
Password:
# yum install openafs-client
# service openafs-client start
# chkconfig openafs-client on

This causes /afs to be mounted – and you can use soft links (ln -s) to put convenient “hooks” were needed to get directly to the dataspace you will want to use.

All TarHeel Linux users get Kerberos tickets at login. To get an AFS token, the user needs to type the following command:

prompt$ aklog

That’s it, folks! Really!